Tarnish, what to do???!!!

What Exactly is Tarnish, and What Causes It? Preventing tarnish on jewelry is far less work than removing it!   Tarnish is a layer of corrosion that develops on many metals, particularly sterling silver. Sulfur and other airborne chemicals are the main cause of tarnish, and jewelry tarnishes much faster if it’s left out in the open than if it’s stored away in an acid-free, closed container. The metal of tarnished jewelry has a darkened, dull appearance, which can really reduce your sales. Keeping your jewelry inventory sparkling and bright makes it sell much better. It’s so much less work to prevent tarnish than to have to remove it. I really don’t mind cleaning each piece of my jewelry inventory once, right after I finish creating it. But I do mind the extremely time-consuming process of having to haul out and re-clean my entire inventory, to shine it up for upcoming shows! 6 Ways to Prevent Tarnish from Building up on Your Jewelry   Closed Plastic Bags Store individual pieces of jewelry in sealed zip-close baggies. Or store entire displays that are already loaded with your inventory inside large, heavy-duty trash bags that are tightly closed. Also store your metal jewelry supplies (wire, findings, headpins, earwires, etc.) in tightly sealed plastic bags. Silver Tarnish Cloth Or, if you store your jewelry inventory loaded onto your displays, you can wrap or cover the displays with Silver Tarnish Cloth (also sometimes called Pacific Cloth), which is available by the yard at fabric stores. I bought several yards of Silver Tarnish Cloth at a local fabric store, using a 50% discount coupon I printed from the store’s website. Then I took the cloth home and cut pieces of it to fit perfectly on top of each jewelry tray and around every other loaded display I have. (You may also want to cut pieces of it to fit inside the drawers or compartments of your personal jewelry box!) No-Tarnish Strips Regardless of how you store your jewelry, put no-tarnish strips in with your inventory, and change the strips every two to three months. Mark the next changing date on your calendar so you don’t forget to put in fresh no-tarnish strips regularly. If your jewelry is displayed in a small, closed case in a shop or gallery, consider putting some of these strips in an unobtrusive spot inside the case. Chalk Instead of no-tarnish strips, you can substitute a few pieces of regular chalkboard chalk in with your jewelry. The chalk works similarly to the strips, absorbing the airborne substances that cause tarnish. Chalk should also be changed every couple of months. Quick Wipedown At the end of every jewelry show or party, give each piece of jewelry a quick wipe with a Sunshine cloth or other jewelry cleaning/polishing cloth. (If it was an outdoor show, do a little more thorough wipe-down.) This will remove anything that settled on the surface of your jewelry while it was out of its closed storage, and will really help prevent tarnish from forming. You can do a wipedown very quickly before you take down your jewelry display – just run the cloth rapidly over everything as though you were doing a speedy dusting job. Then store your jewelry in one of the ways recommended above to keep tarnishing elements away from it. Acid-Free Paperstock Use acid-free paper or cardstock for your jewelry tags, earring cards, and any other paper goods or packaging that are stored in the same container with your jewelry. To Remove Tarnish from Jewelry: How to Clean Tarnished Silver Jewelry Here’s an easy way to clean tarnished silver jewelry, using a few things you already have in your kitchen. Unlike silver polish, this jewelry cleaning method does not remove any of the silver.

jewellery care

JEWELRY CARE
How to Care for Swarovski Crystal Jewelry,Semi-Precious Gemstone Jewelry and Sterling Silver Jewelry.

JEWELRY CARE
How to Care for Swarovski Crystal Jewelry,Semi-Precious Gemstone Jewelry and Sterling Silver Jewelry.

JEWELRY CARE
How to Care for Swarovski Crystal Jewelry,Semi-Precious Gemstone Jewelry and Sterling Silver Jewelry.

How To Care For Your Jewelry:

Swarovski Crystals and Swarovski Pearls: Swarovski crystals and pearls may be cleaned with warm soapy water or a warm water and ammonia solution (do not use ammonia solution on gemstone jewelry). Both will aid in removing dirt and oil and restore the shine. They may also be cleaned with a polishing cloth.

Sterling Silver: Sterling silver jewelry may be cleaned with a silver polishing cloth or dipped in sterling silver tarnish remover.

Pearls: Freshwater pearls can be cleaned with a soft cloth to remove dirt and oil. Never dip pearls in tarnish remover because it will strip the pearls of their luster. Do not use a silver polishing cloth on pearls. Store pearl jewelry separate from other jewelry pieces, so other pieces don’t scratch the pearls.

Storing: To minimize tarnishing of your silver jewelry, always store in a plastic ziplock bag. Exposure to air causes tarnishing.

** Put your jewelry on after you have applied hair spray, perfumes, body sprays, lotions, etc., to help maintain its natural beauty.

just got back from Tuscon

What words can I use to describe the gem, bead and mineral show in Tuscon, Arizona. Overwhelming comes to mind first, exciting, ouch (spent a lot on beads) and beautiful. Set amid the mountains there are actually hundreds of tents in rec centres, convention centres, hotels, hotel parking lots and of course along the streets. We had sooooo much fun we can’t wait to go back next year. The last box of beads we shipped home arrived today, nothing broken (mind you we spent two nights in our hotel room packing them). We also bought an extra suitcase down there and filled it and loaded up our own with what we could carry. So now the fun begins and we start to create. Watch for our new selection of button jewellery, zipper jewellery, recycled items turned into jewellery and our scarves and scarf pendants. Itching to start. I will check in soon.

Other styles of earrings by definition

•Huggy Earrings:
Huggies are a popular style of non-pierced earrings where the setting actually ”hugs” your earlobe. A hinge is located at the top of the earring that allows the post to open and close without an earring back. Many times, stones are channel set in huggy earrings.
•Sleeper Earrings:
Sleeper earrings (also known as starter earrings) are designed to be comfortable when worn for long periods of time and are generally small to prevent entanglement with bedding or hair. Because their small size makes them comfortable, sleeper earrings are sometimes worn at night to keep an ear piercing from closing. Common styles include studs with short posts or screw backs and small hoops.
•Ear Cuffs:
An ear cuff is decorative ring designed to be pinched onto the ear without need for piercing. Ear cuffs may be pinched onto any part of the ear, not just the earlobe.

Stud Earrings

Stud earrings are defined as a single gems or group of gems, set in a mounting that fits close to the earlobe. Stud earrings appear to ”float” on the earlobe without a visible point of connection. The adornment is secured on the end of a post, which penetrates straight through the ear. The post is held in place by a removable friction back or clutch. The stud post can also be threaded, allowing a screw back to securely hold the earring in place.

A bit of info re earrings

Earrings have enjoyed a long history of being used as adornment, cultural identification and a sign of wealth and prosperity for thousands of years, dating back to 2500 B.C. According to legend, evil spirits were thought to be able to enter the body through any of its openings and take control. The first earrings were probably worn to bar away these spirits. Even though earring styles and popularity have fluctuated throughout time based on economic conditions, fashion and style influences and societal factors, they have always remained an important part of fashion.

Originating in Asia and the Middle East, there were two common types of earrings, the hoop and the more elaborate pendant. Earrings were used as a simple way to determine the wearer’s religious, political or tribal identity. Earrings were also an indicator of the individual’s social status in the community and were considered a sign of wealth and prosperity. Among sailors, a pierced earlobe was a symbol that the wearer had sailed around the world or had crossed the equator. In addition, it is commonly held that a gold earring was worn by sailors as payment for a proper burial in the event that they might drown at sea. Earrings were also worn for acupuncture purposes, commonly believed to aid eyesight and hearing.

During the Roman Empire, wealthy women used earrings to show off their rich status. By the 2nd century A.D., gemstones such as sapphires, emeralds and aquamarines were used regularly in earring designs. In the Dark Ages, poverty prevailed and metal jewelry sharply declined although designs were preserved for later use. During the Middle Ages attention turned to elaborate hairstyles, skillfully crafted dresses and headdresses, resulting in earrings losing much of their appeal.

However, during the 16th century, high collars disappeared and hair was being worn up and away from the face, so earrings began to make a comeback. During the 1850s, earrings lost popularity once again as hair was tied behind the head, covering the ears, or bonnets and hats were worn. In addition, the religious and social sentiments of the time associated earrings with heathens, vanity and excess.

With the 1920s came the advent of the clip-on earring, causing ear piercing to fall out of favor. Many viewed clip-on earrings as being more sanitary and proper.

By the middle of the 20th century, earrings of all shapes and sizes were popular, though there was a clear distinction between more conservative earrings worn during the day, and more glamorous earrings worn in the evenings. In the 1970s, pierced earrings gained popularity and at the same time, styles merged and were no longer limited to either day or night wear.

Today we see a wide variety of earring styles, for both men and women. Here’s a guide to some of the most common styles, including design ideas and product links, for easy identification and creative inspiration.

Earrings have enjoyed a long history of being used as adornment, cultural identification and a sign of wealth and prosperity for thousands of years, dating back to 2500 B.C. According to legend, evil spirits were thought to be able to enter the body through any of its openings and take control. The first earrings were probably worn to bar away these spirits. Even though earring styles and popularity have fluctuated throughout time based on economic conditions, fashion and style influences and societal factors, they have always remained an important part of fashion.

Originating in Asia and the Middle East, there were two common types of earrings, the hoop and the more elaborate pendant. Earrings were used as a simple way to determine the wearer’s religious, political or tribal identity. Earrings were also an indicator of the individual’s social status in the community and were considered a sign of wealth and prosperity. Among sailors, a pierced earlobe was a symbol that the wearer had sailed around the world or had crossed the equator. In addition, it is commonly held that a gold earring was worn by sailors as payment for a proper burial in the event that they might drown at sea. Earrings were also worn for acupuncture purposes, commonly believed to aid eyesight and hearing.

During the Roman Empire, wealthy women used earrings to show off their rich status. By the 2nd century A.D., gemstones such as sapphires, emeralds and aquamarines were used regularly in earring designs. In the Dark Ages, poverty prevailed and metal jewelry sharply declined although designs were preserved for later use. During the Middle Ages attention turned to elaborate hairstyles, skillfully crafted dresses and headdresses, resulting in earrings losing much of their appeal.

However, during the 16th century, high collars disappeared and hair was being worn up and away from the face, so earrings began to make a comeback. During the 1850s, earrings lost popularity once again as hair was tied behind the head, covering the ears, or bonnets and hats were worn. In addition, the religious and social sentiments of the time associated earrings with heathens, vanity and excess.

With the 1920s came the advent of the clip-on earring, causing ear piercing to fall out of favor. Many viewed clip-on earrings as being more sanitary and proper.

By the middle of the 20th century, earrings of all shapes and sizes were popular, though there was a clear distinction between more conservative earrings worn during the day, and more glamorous earrings worn in the evenings. In the 1970s, pierced earrings gained popularity and at the same time, styles merged and were no longer limited to either day or night wear.

Today we see a wide variety of earring styles, for both men and women. Here’s a guide to some of the most common styles, including design ideas and product links, for easy identification and creative inspiration.

Crystal glass nail files have arrived

Have you ever used one of these fabulous files. If not I can almost guarantee if you do you will be hooked like I was.

Four years ago my daughter and I bought a set at a craft show and I took the small and medium one, one for my purse and one for my night table, she took the large one. WELL, now I wouldn’t be without them. They work fabulously well on real or artificial nails (thank God).
I started giving them as gifts and then the people I gave them to wanted to know where they could get some as gifts and well, the rest is history. My friend Pat McKay decided to retire so we offered to take over her business. (Its nice when you have a resident folk artist in your team.)

 We have only put a few on the site and will be selling them singularly as well for those of you who don’t need or want 3.
You owe it to yourself to try these. Here are a few reasons why:
Fact Sheet- Glass Nail Files

• Innovative and new!

• The only glass file guaranteed to never wear out or wear down.

• Superior to any file on the market. Vast improvement over traditional nail files.

• Each design is an original work of art

• Use on natural and artificial nails.

• With continued use reduces chipping, peeling and splitting of natural nails.

• Filing surface is so smooth; it will not disturb nail polish during touch-ups.

• Won’t tear or harm delicate skin. Safe for diabetics and babies.

• Filing surface is non-porous, double-sided and permanently etched into the glass.

• The only file that can be sanitized 100% using UVB light, autoclave, heat or liquid disinfectant. This applies to clear handle files ONLY.

• Made from float glass, the same process used to produce wine goblets and crystal vases.

• Environmentally friendly. NO lead is added or chemicals used during the manufacturing process.

• Tempered and hardened for durability and safety, 102% stronger than standard glass. • Files that have not been through the tempering and hardening process can splinter.

• Designed to break in a blunt fashion, should you drop your file, reducing the risk of injury.

• Small file is 3.5 inches in length perfect for tucking in a hand bag.

• The medium size is 5.5. Inches in length and is ideal for manicures.

• The large file is 7.5 inches in length and is just the thing for cracked heels and calluses.

• The grit on the small and medium file is approximately 200 – 220 grit.

• The grit on the large file is approximately 180 grit. • Files breeze through airport security.

• A protective sheath is included with each file.
Sooooooo buy yours today. Yack soon, Deb

A Little History of the Leverback Earwire

Leverback Earring Components
History
The leverback or hinged earwire has been seen on earrings dating from the 1880s. The leverback is designed to snap tightly over the wire without causing discomfort to the wearer, yet remaining comfortable to use. This earring style is immensely popular for fine jewelry in gold and silver as the leverback design helps prevent earring loss.

Use
Immensely popular in European jewelry, the leverback recently made a transition to the North American market. It is growing in popularity due to its low profile, sturdy construction and additional security. The leverback is available in multiple styles; some have attached or dangling embellishments, some have single preset stones–some have both. Other leverback styles are equipped with loops for attaching dangles and drops, pegs for half-drilled pearls and beads or empty settings for cabochons and faceted gemstones.

sample of leverback earwires

Bracelet Circumference

In this blog I wanted to teach you a bit about how to buy the right size bracelet for your wrist.

Bracelets are traditionally sized by length. This way of measuring does not work so well for many types of beaded bracelets because a beaded bracelet’s fit depends on the diameter of its beads. The larger the beads, the smaller the inside circumference of the bracelet will be.. So, the same person will wear a longer bracelet if it has larger beads, and a shorter bracelet if it has smaller beads, are you still with me. So what to do.

Measure your wrist using a flexible measuring tape and measure tightly where you would place your watch. Add a half inch to one inch for approximate sizing for a bracelet depending on how tight or loose you like the bracelet to be. We can figure out how large the beads are and size accordingly.

Now what about if its a gift for a friend and you don’t have their wrist size. Use the following as a guidline. These are circumference measurements.
Petite: 6.5
Small : 6.75
Average: 7.0
Large: 7.25
XL 7.5
XXL 8.0
Don’t forget to have a look at my new memory wire bracelets. They are comfortable and fit a variety of wrist sizes. We have many sizes of tube beads too so if you want it large and loose we will use longer tube beads on them. Stay tuned for my next blog on necklace lengths. Spring is around the corner so hang in there.

check out my new improved website

Hi all, been really busy getting my website updated with new products and freshened up with a new facelift. We have been designing and photographing new products which will be added in the next few days. some of them are one ofs so if you want it don’t delay. I will be posting tips on the blog too for example, care of your silver jewellery. Any ideas will be appreciated. Anyway, its been a long day, going to go eat and relax a bit then back at it tomorrow. Thanks for tuning in… Deb